Talks

15 shows found
Thinking Like a Roman: How to Renew America's Polarized Landscape
1:00 PM
Auditorium, Getty Villa
Free Event; Ticket Required

Can Lessons from ancient Rome help resolve contemporary political struggles? While many historians are skeptical given Rome's history of conquest, slavery, and autocratic rule, classicist Joy Connolly suggests that the Roman example paves the way toward lively, civil discourse on hot-button issues. Connolly Proposes that Roman thinkers, especially Ciscero, can help us better understand our political values and talk with one another across political affiliations.
2/24/2018 1:00 PM
Sonnets and Sonatas presents Animals!
7:30 PM
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

How do artists and composers evoke, imitate, mock, or pay tribute to animals, which are both our best companions and our radical "other"? This lecture-concert attempts to answer this question through a presentation by Laure Murat, professor of French and Francophone Studies at UCLA, and performances of works by Rimsky-Korsakov, Faure, Rameau, Rossini, Cage, Gershwin, and others. With special guest Vincent Penot, clarinetist of the Opera de Paris, in his U.S. debut.
2/24/2018 7:30 PM
Provenance Research - A Personal Concern
7:00 PM
Museum Lecture Hall, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

In this conversation, prominent art historians and researchers examine reasons for tracing the history of an artwork's ownership.
3/1/2018 7:00 PM
Paper Play in Photography
7:00 PM
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center
Free Event, Ticker Required

Virginia Heckert, curator of photographs, speaks with artists whose work is displayed in the exhibition Cut! Paper Play in Contemporary Photography. They discuss the integral role of paper in their practice, either in their creation of paper sculptures for the sole purpose of photographing them, or their employment of cutting, folding, and layering to imbue representational photographs with tactile qualities.
3/7/2018 7:00 PM
Kay Redfield Jamison: Mental Illness and Creativity
7:00PM
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

Kay Redfield Jamison, author of An Unquiet Mind and Night Falls Fast, is joined by Ayelet Waldman, author of A Really Good Day and Bad Mother, for a discussion of the relationship between illness and art. Jamison's latest book, Robert Lowell: Setting the Stone on Fire, illuminates the interplay of mania, depression, and creativity.
3/8/2018 7:00 PM
Love Her to Death...and Back: the Enduring Myth of Orpheus and Eurydice
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM, followed by reception
Auditorium, Getty Villa
Tickets: $35. Complimentary parking.

Enjoy an afternoon of art and music inspired by an underworld love story. The program features talks about the Greek Myth and its continuing allure, a presentation by maestro James Conlon on LA Opera's production of Orpheus and Eurydice, a special musical performance, and a reception with after-hours viewing of the museum's galleries.
3/11/2018 1:00 PM
Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia in the Middle Ages and Today
3:00 PM
Museum Lecture Hall, Getty Center
Free Event, Ticket Required

Historians Sara Lipton and Hussein Fancy examine the fraught status of Jews and Muslims in western Europe during the Middle Ages, and discuss the often entwined histories of these of two groups, both of whom were cast as outsiders. The discussion, moderated by Jihad Turk, sheds light on contemporary experiences as well.
3/11/2018 3:00 PM
India through a European Lens: Seventeenth Century Images and Words
7:00 PM
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center
Free Event, Ticket Required

Sanjay Subrahmanyam, distinguished professor of history at UCLA, examines the perception of India in 17th-century western Europe, as mediated through images (prints, miniatures, etc), as well as by words, especially those of travelers, traders, and missionaries. Special attention is paid to the Dutch perspective, and how it may have impacted the work of Rembrandt. Complements the exhibition Rembrandt and the Inspiration of India.
3/14/2018 7:00 PM
In Conversation: Carolee Schneeman on Her Art and Archive
7:00 PM
Museum Lecture Hall, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

Carolee Schneemann, one of the pioneers of 1960s feminist art, discusses the practical and aesthetic aspects of her archive, house at the Getty Research Institute.
3/20/2018 7:00 PM
Art of Writing: Geoff Dyer's The Street Philosophy of Garry Winogrand
7:00 PM
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

Award-winning author Geoff Dyer presents his new book, a masterfully curated selection of 100 photographs by American artist Garry Winogrand. Critics describe it as "a lesson in the pleasures of seeing" by a "savvy, observant, and highly entertaining guide."
3/21/2018 7:00 PM
How to Look at Egyptian Art
7:00 PM
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

Renowned expert on ancient art, Robert Bianchi, former curator in the Department of Egyptian, Classical and Ancient Middle Eastern Art at the Brooklyn Museum, explains how ancient Egyptians approached the visual arts, and how we can understand what they created.
3/28/2018 7:00 PM
Drawing from Mughal India in the Age of Rembrandt
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Museum Lecture Hall, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

To elucidate the importance of India for the Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669) and other Europeans of his time, this symposium traces historical, political, economic, and artistic points of contact between Europe and the Mughal Indian Empire in the early modern period. Taking the Getty’s exhibition Rembrandt and the Inspiration of India as a starting point, scholars will demonstrate how Mughal paintings and drawings were received in Europe not as merely exotic curiosities, but also as objects possessing specific associations of political authority and exceptional artifice. Participating speakers in the symposium include historians Benjamin Schmidt, Carolien Stolte, and Jos Goomans, and art historians Jessica Keating, Chanchal Dadlani, and Navina Haidar.
4/8/2018 10:00 AM
Finding Michlangelo, and Other Tales
4:00 PM
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

The discovery of a long-lost Michelangelo drawing in 1995 in the library of Castle Howard, England, made newspaper headlines around the world. That drawing, Study of a Mourning Woman, was recently acquired by the J. Paul Getty Museum. In this talk, the discoverer of the drawing, Julien Stock (formerly of Sotheby's), tells of that magical moment, and of a lifetime of detective work as a connoisseur of old master drawings and paintings.
4/15/2018 4:00 PM
The Fantasy of Ancient Egypt from Classical Greece to the Present Day
3:00 PM
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center
Free Event; Ticket Required

From the ancient Greeks and Romans to the 19th century, European scholars have been fascinated by pharaonic Egypt. They imagined that the land of the Nile was the oldest and most learned of all civilizations. But it was not until 1822 that the science of modern Egyptology commenced. Jeffrey Spier, senior curator of antiquities, examines the endurance of Egypt's mysterious allure.
4/29/2018 3:00 PM
APPEAR: Ancient Panel Painting, Examination, Analysis and Research
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM | Friday 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM followed by reception
Auditorium, Getty Villa
Registration fee: $50. Includes attendance at both days of conference, on-site parking, coffee breaks and reception.

This two-day conference marks the end of a four-year Getty initiative on the study of ancient panel painting from Roman Egypt. The presentations and posters will be given by project participants highlighting the collaborative work, investigations, observations and data collected to date. The conference is open to the public, however it is targeted towards a scholarly and engaged audience interested in ancient panel painting methods and materials.

In 2013, the J. Paul Getty Museum’s Department of Antiquities Conservation launched the APPEAR (Ancient Panel Paintings: Examination, Analysis, and Research) Project. The mission of this project is to increase the understanding of ancient painting technology, its production, materials, clues to workshop and artistic practice. Participating institutions research their collections and contribute results into a shared database. The collective information obtained from numerous entries not only promotes comparison between the artifacts but helps develop a broader understanding of materials and technology in the ancient world.

More conference information
5/17/2018 9:00 AM
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